Quick Answer: What Part Of Speech Are Possessive Pronouns?

What are examples of possessive pronouns?

Possessive pronouns show that something belongs to someone.

The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their.

There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs..

Is there a possessive adjective?

Definition of Possessive Adjective: A word that indicates the possession of the noun to a person/a few people. The possessive adjectives are my, our, your, his, their, her, and its.

Can a verb be possessive?

The verbs below are used for “possession” (have, belong, own, posses). … Possessive forms are frequently modifiers for verb forms used as nouns, or gerunds. Using the possessive will affect how we read the sentence. Usually, almost always in fact, we use the possessive form of a noun or pronoun to modify a gerund.

What are the two types of possessive pronouns?

They are the pronouns that help us show possession or ownership in a sentence. There are two types of possessive pronouns: The strong (or absolute) possessive pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, and theirs.

What is a possessive pronoun and give examples?

Possessive pronouns include my, mine, our, ours, its, his, her, hers, their, theirs, your and yours. … Here are some basic examples of possessive pronouns used in sentences: The kids are yours and mine. The house is theirs and its paint is flaking.

How do you teach possessive pronouns?

Want to learn more?If you use a possessive pronoun before the thing that is owned, you should use: my, your, his, her, its, our, and their. … If you use a possessive pronoun after the thing that is owned, you should use: mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs.More items…

What is a possessive phrase?

These are noun phrases which are compounds with more than one noun, or which include other phrases, such as prepositional phrases and relative clauses, and which are then turned into possessive phrases with ‘s attached to the final word in the phrase.

Is my a possessive pronoun or adjective?

My, your, his and her are all possessive adjectives. We use a possessive adjective before a noun: This is my brother.

What is an example of a possessive adjective?

They are words that modify a noun to show a form of possession, a sense of belonging or ownership to a specific person, animal or thing. The possessive adjectives that are used in the English language are: my, your, our, its, her, his, and their; each one corresponds to a subject pronoun.

Is a possessive noun?

A possessive noun is a noun that shows possession or belonging. This will generally include an’s for a singular person possessing one or more persons, places, or things, called a singular possessive noun; and an s’ for more than one person possessing singular or plural persons, places, or things.

What part of speech shows ownership?

SHOW POSSESSION: The function that allows a word to show ownership; nouns show possession by adding ‘S (or if the word normally ends in s, just an apostrophe). Pronouns have possessive forms and do not contain apostrophes.

What is possessive noun with example?

Possessive nouns are nouns that show ownership or possession. Normally these words would be a singular or plural noun, but in the possessive form they are used as adjectives to modify another a noun or pronoun. Here the word “cat’s” is a possessive noun. It is letting you know that the noun “fur” belongs to the cat.

What part of speech is possessive noun?

A possessive noun is a noun that possesses something—i.e., it has something. In most cases, a possessive noun is formed by adding an apostrophe +s to the noun, or if the noun is plural and already ends in s, only an apostrophe needs to be added.

What are the 13 possessive pronouns?

My, mine, your, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns. Use my, your, her, our, and their before nouns.

What is the difference between possessive adjective and possessive pronouns?

A possessive adjective is an adjective that is used to show ownership. It comes before a noun in the sentence and lets us know to whom the noun belongs. … A possessive pronoun does show ownership, but it does not come before a noun or in a noun phrase.

What is the difference between pronoun and adjective?

The simplest explanation is that adjectives modify nouns or pronouns, and pronouns refer back to nouns that were mentioned earlier in a sentence or paragraph. …

How do you identify a possessive pronoun?

Possessive pronouns describe what things belong to which people, like “her shoe” or “the book is mine.” Possessive pronouns can be adjectives, like “his bicycle,” or they can stand in for nouns, like “the seats are theirs.” Neither of these forms should have apostrophes to show possession — so it’s ours (not our’s) …

Who are possessive pronouns?

Whose is a pronoun used in questions to ask who owns something or has something. … That’s what the apostrophe indicates in who’s, and that’s why whose is the possessive form of the pronoun .